The Church building is on the site of an earlier church which was rebuilt by William Briwere in the early 13th century and has been designated as a Grade I Listed building which is dedicated to Saint Mary, the Virgin.

St Mary's church has a north porch and windows dating from the 14th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries chapels were added, modifying the nave and the chancel extended.

In July 1685, during the Monmouth Rebellion, the Duke of Monmouth watched from the tower as the forces of King James II assembled, at Westonzoyland, under the command of the Earl of Feversham prior to the Battle of Sedgemoor.

The spire, which was built in 1367, is 114 feet 7.5 inches (34.938 m) high and sits on top of the 64 feet (20 m) tower. The spire was split by lightning in 1814 and repaired the following year.

On the face of the tower is a clock installed in 1869 replacing earlier clocks which had been on the tower since 1393.

Within the tower are eight bells. The oldest bell dates from 1617 with further bells being added through the 17th and 18th centuries.

The most recent bell is the Tenor which dates from 1868 and was cast by John Taylor & Co.

In the 1840s major renovation work included the removal of the galleries and box pews.

Saint Mary's was radically rebuilt from the late 1840's as the result of the impact of the Tractarian movement on Anglican liturgy.

The vestry was built in 1902 and in the early 1920s a memorial chapel was formed to the south of the chancel in memory of the dead of the First World War.

Saint Mary's was radically rebuilt from the late 1840's as the result of the impact of the Tractarian movement on Anglican liturgy.

The galleries were removed, as well as the box pews.

The Corporation pews were removed to their present position. The nave was fitted out with numerous pews in gothic style. More work was done in the 1870's.

During the 1930's much simplification of the elaborate Victorian ornamentation at the east end of the Chancel was carried out.

The interior of the church includes a 13 feet by 8 feet painting of the Descent from the Cross of Spanish or Italian origin given to the church by Anne Poulett the Member of Parliament for the Bridgwater constituency in 1775.It was apparently captured when a Spanish warship was taken a prize. The artist is unknown, although it has been controversially attributed to Murillo or Annibale Carracci.

The picture is now used as the altarpiece of the church. It also possesses a fine painted reredos, and an octagonal 16th century oak pulpit
 
 
 
 
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